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Returns to seniority in union and nonunion jobs a new look at the evidence by Katharine G. Abraham

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Published by Dept. of Economics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Mass .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementKatherine G. Abraham and Henry S. Farber
SeriesWorking paper / Dept. of Economics -- no. 458, Working paper (Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Economics) -- no. 458.
ContributionsFarber, Henry S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Economics
The Physical Object
Pagination27 p. ;
Number of Pages27
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL24629747M
OCLC/WorldCa17746909

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Returns to Seniority in Union and Nonunion Jobs: A New Look at the Evidence Katharine G. Abraham, Henry S. Farber. NBER Working Paper No. (Also Reprint No. r) Issued in August NBER Program(s):Labor Studies. One of the most prominent features of U.S. unionism is the key role played by seniority. Returns to Seniority in Union and Nonunion Jobs: A New Look at the Evidence Article (PDF Available) in Industrial and Labor Relations Review 42(1) .   Corrected estimates imply that the return to seniority is, in fact, larger in the union sector than in the nonunion sector. Suggested Citation: Suggested Citation Farber, Henry S., Returns to Seniority in Union and Nonunion Jobs: a New Look at the Evidence (August ).Cited by: Download Citation | Returns to Seniority in Union and Nonunion Jobs: a New Look at the Evidence | One of the most prominent features of U.S. unionism is the key role played by seniority. However.

Downloadable! One of the most prominent features of U.S. unionism is the key role played by seniority. However, in cross-sectional data, the positive association between seniority and earnings is typically much stronger for nonunion workers than for union workers. This finding has puzzled previous researchers, since it seems inconsistent with the generalization that seniority is more important. Returns to Seniority in Union and Nonunion Jobs: A New Look at the Evidence. By Katharine G. Abraham and Henry S. Farber. Get PDF ( KB) Abstract. One of the most prominent features of U.S. unionism is the key role played by seniority. Job Queues and the Union Status of Workers,".   In a union-represented workplace, if a job is eliminated or a layoff becomes necessary, senior employees have job rights over recent employees. In these cases, an employee with seniority may even be reassigned to take over the job of a newer employee when the senior employee's job . Returns to Seniority in Union and Nonunion Jobs: A New Look at the Evidence. Katharine Abraham and Henry S. Farber. No , NBER Working Papers from National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc Abstract: One of the most prominent features of U.S. unionism is the key role played by seniority. However, in cross-sectional data, the positive association between seniority and earnings is typically.

Downloadable! In cross-sectional data, the positive association between seniority and earnings is typically much stronger for nonunion workers than for union workers, a finding that seems inconsistent with the generalization that seniority is more important in the union sector than in the nonunion sector. The authors of this paper show that standard estimates of the return to seniority are. Get this from a library! Returns to Seniority in Union and Nonunion Jobs: a New Look at the Evidence. [Henry S Farber; Katharine G Abraham; National Bureau of Economic Research.;] -- One of the most prominent features of U.S. unionism is the key role played by seniority. However, in cross-sectional data, the positive association between seniority and earnings is typically much. Get this from a library! Returns to seniority in union and nonunion jobs: a new look at the evidence. [Katharine G Abraham; Henry S Farber; National Bureau of Economic Research.]. returntoseniority,,assumingthatir. ispositive, thebias will be largerwhere the variance in unobservedability (var(A.))is , againassuming that.